Negotiating The Terms Of A Marital Settlement Agreement In Divorce

by Robin Roshkind, Esquire, West Palm Beach, Florida

Generally speaking, the divorce issues that need to be dealt with include as follows: alimony or spousal support, attorneys fees and costs, mediation fees, declaring what property is marital and what is non marital, fairly dividing up what is marital property and personal property, and dividing up marital debt, then declaring what is not marital debt. There is also the issue of the marital home and other real property, as to who will buy out whom, or will the properties be rented, or listed for sale and what happens then.  

Aside from these financial issues, are children’s issues, which include as follows: time sharing to each parent, child support worksheet calculations, shared parental responsibility or sole parental responsibility on certain decision making, (who will do homework), a parenting plan, schooling, religious training, counseling, and whether a parenting coordinator will be beneficial to facilitate the matter between the parties. 

All of these terms go into a 30 or so page document called a marital settlement agreement.  This agreement is agreed to and signed by the parties and becomes part of a final judgment of dissolution of marriage. 

As anyone can imagine, with all that there is to decide, two divorcing people will have a hard time.  That is where lawyers, accountants and shrinks come into the picture.  With knowledge about the possible ruling from a judge under the law, the team of experts guide the parties.  They can either negotiate in good faith and reach a resolution no one likes but everyone can live with, or the judge will decide their futures by enforceable court order.  For more information about this or other divorce topics, call one of the lawyers at ROBIN ROSHKIND, P.A. at 561 835 9091 or click on the Firm’s web site at http://www.familylawwpb.com.

What Is A Parenting Coordinator?

By Robin Roshkind, Esquire, West Palm Beach, Florida

A parenting coordinator is a trained, court appointed social worker who can help parents reach an agreement as to what time sharing schedule is in the best interests of the child/ren.  This person can also address issues between divorcing parents as to who takes the children to the doctor, who picks up from school, who provides sports equipment for after care programs, and also can assist the parents in making decisions about which programs the children shall participate in and who pays the fees, uniforms, equipment, etc.

Parenting coordinators take the caseload off the divorce court judge, who generally does not want to micro manage the lives of litigants.  They assist in decision making, so that the parents can get along better and have a third person’s opinion.  It is not binding, just helpful.

Where parents have trouble communicating, or have competing interests with each other, a parenting coordinator can point out that it is the child’s interests that should come first.  Like a mediator, a parenting coordinator helps resolve parenting issues that can then be reduced to a court order by agreement of the divorcing parents.

For additional information about this or other divorce topics, call one of the divorce lawyers at ROBIN ROSHKIND, P.A. at 561 835 9091 or click on the Firm’s web site at http://www.familylawwpb.com for more information.

What Is A Parenting Coordinator?

By Robin Roshkind, Esquire, West Palm Beach, Florida

The courts have a job to do in divorce…sure the judge rules on the split of assets and debts…but more importantly, the judge’s job in divorce court is to protect children of the marriage.  There are several ways to do this and one way is to use a parenting coordinator.

This is a specially trained social worker or psychologist graduate who works with parents to smooth over time sharing issues.  The parties can turn to this third person, if and when there are problems with pick up and drop off of children, after care programs, supervision for parents with their children, domestic violence issues and so on.

Working with a parenting coordinator helps parents who cannot deal with each other easily, or who have a tendency to use children as pawns to get to the other parent.   Parenting coordinators generally do not work with the children themselves.  For more information about this or other divorce topics, call one of the divorce lawyers at ROBIN ROSHKIND, P.A. at 561 835 9091 or click on the Firm’s web site at www.familylawwpb.com for more information.