“He Said She Said” Not Enough In Divorce Court

by Robin Roshkind, Esquire, West Palm Beach, Florida
After filing for divorce in Palm Beach County, it is mandatory that the parties exchange financial information by way of proof.  This helps to settle divorce issues like alimony and attorneys fees, child support and division of marital assets and debts.

Each party must provide to the other things like tax returns, bank statements, credit card bills, pay check stubs or income statements, mortgages, investment and retirement accounts and the like.  Both parties are required to disclose this information under Florida Family Law Rule 12.285, which is commonly referred to as the mandatory disclosure rule.  In most cases, the court requires going back one to three years with these statements.

The court views these statements as the back up data to a parties’ sworn financial affidavit, perhaps the most important document in any divorce.  A divorce cannot be granted without one.  Proof of income is used for child support calculation purposes; to show need or ability to pay alimony and attorneys fees.  Credit card and other billing statements show debt.  Investment accounts, mortgages, and deeds to real estate show lifestyle of the marriage and determine equitable distribution schemes.

The paper pile tends to grow but merely standing in court and testifying as to your need, or lifestyle or debt is just not enough for the divorce court judge.  Your allegations must always be backed up by proof.  For more information about this or other divorce topics, call one of the divorce lawyers at ROBIN ROSHKIND, P.A. at 561 835 9091 or click on the Firm’s web site at http://www.familylawwpb.com for more information.

What Is Temporary Relief?

by Robin Roshkind, Esquire, West Palm Beach, Florida

Temporary relief includes any kind of relief for the “have not” spouse, to allow the spouse to live and pay bills, pending the outcome of divorce proceedings.  There is usually a temporary relief hearing before the judge, in the event that a court ordered and required mediation does not resolve in a global settlement of the divorce.

Temporary relief can include a court order on child support, time sharing, shared parental responsibility, alimony, attorneys fees, exclusive use and possession of the marital home, a partial division of marital assets and debts, and any other relief requested by the spouse, to allow normal household bills to be paid, and maintain the status quo pending any outcome in the divorce.  Temporary relief stays in place until further order of the court, or an agreement of the parties.  Temporary relief may or may not be precedent setting.  For more information about this or other divorce topics, call one of the Palm Beach divorce lawyers at 561 835 9091 or click on the Firm’s web site at http://www.familylawwpb.com.

You And Your Divorce Lawyer…

by Robin Roshkind, Esquire, West Palm Beach, Florida

You and your divorce lawyer have a special relationship. First, anything conveyed to your lawyer, in writing or verbally, is confidential.  This includes any communications with any of your lawyer’s staffers as well.  Your lawyer is there to advocate for your position and hold you out in the best light possible under the facts of the matter.

Your lawyer knows divorce law in your jurisdiction.  You must listen and follow his or her advice.  That is what you are paying for…your lawyer’s time, skill set and expertise.

Speaking of paying, be sure you keep current with your bill.  Your lawyer will stay on and continue to represent you, as long as the legal fees are being paid.  The reverse is true as well.  If for some reason you do not pay your lawyer, the judge most likely will let your lawyer withdraw from representing you.

You must cooperate.  If you are supposed to produce documents, don’t be your own worst enemy, or your lawyer’s, by not producing these items in a timely manner.

Lastly, if you are not sure about something, call for a meeting with your lawyer.  It is much better to have an open discussion than remain in the dark and not understand what is going on that involves your future.  For more information about this or other divorce topics, call one of the divorce lawyers at ROBIN ROSHKIND, P.A. at 561 835 9091 or click on the Firm’s web site at http://www.familylawwpb.com for more information.

What Is Temporary Relief In Divorce Actions In Florida?

by Robin Roshkind, Esquire, West Palm Beach, Florida

Temporary relief can be obtained by agreement of the parties that is reduced to a court order, or by a mini trial before the judge in Palm Beach County Family Court.  The issues to be decided in temporary relief are primarily support and time sharing with children.  Support includes temporary alimony and child support, especially if a spouse has cut you off.   Division of assets and debts is not generally a temporary relief issue unless marital assets need to be partially distributed to pay the attorneys.

Temporary relief is a mini trial that occurs AFTER a mediation in an attempt to settle the issues of temporary support and time sharing.  Child support, alimony, time sharing and attorneys fees are the main temporary relief issues.  Other temporary relief issues can include who pays for which household bills, credit cards,  and medical expenses and insurance during the divorce proceedings.

Temporary relief hearings may include the testimony of the parties and CPAs who testify as to the need of one spouse for temporary relief and the ability to pay by the other spouse.  For more information about this or other divorce topics call one of the divorce lawyers at ROBIN ROSHKIND, PA at 561 835 9091 or click on the Firm’s web site at http://www.familylawwpb.com.

If You Think You Have A Divorce Settlement, BE CAREFUL!

by Robin Roshkind, Esquire, West Palm Beach, Florida

We divorce lawyers have a old trick…get the other side to think we are settling the case, but then move forward to the divorce proceedings.  The moral of the story is, in divorce court, if you do not have a signed settlement agreement, or a signed agreed order, you do not have an agreement.  You may think you do, but therein lies the problem for you.

In Florida, it is a statutory requirement that all “agreements” be in writing and signed by the husband and wife.   So if you have discovery that is due, temporary alimony payments that are due, depositions that are set, a court hearing to attend, your lawyer still must prepare as if there is no settlement at all until such time as there is a signed document.  Don’t fall into the settlement trap.

For more information about this or other divorce topics, call one of the divorce lawyers at ROBIN ROSHKIND, P.A. at 561 835 9091 or click on the Firm’s web site at http://www.familylawwpb.com.

What Is A Complex Divorce?

by Robin Roshkind, Esquire, West Palm Beach, Florida

A complex divorce is one in which there are many issues to resolve and the Husband and Wife are anything but agreeable.  It could involve many real estate properties, tax issues, a privately held corporation or several closely held businesses, marital assets in several states, trust assets, split siblings or special needs children, assets or businesses that need valuations, and supplemental issues including vocational studies, custody battles, an unfit parent, off shore bank accounts and the like.   Complex divorces can also include bad behavior including adultery and the dissipation of marital assets due to outside relationships, gambling, drug or alcohol use or uncontrollable shopping or other mental health issues.

The more complex the marriage, the more complex the divorce.  The more a couple has to fight over, generally the more complex the divorce.  This type of divorce usually turns ugly and requires the use of a divorce team.  This team includes psychologists or psychiatrists, appraisers, private investigator, real estate agents, CPAs, estate planning attorneys, corporate attorneys, tax attorneys, and of course the divorce lawyer.   For more information about this or other divorce topics, call one of the divorce lawyers at ROBIN ROSHKIND, P.A. at 561 835 9091 or click on the Firm’s web site at http://www.familylawwpb.com.